Optrel Satellite Auto-Darkening Filter Helmet Improves Weld Accuracy

Directed by President Jason Rubach from its Northvale, New Jersey (NJ) headquarters, RCS Northvale markets and sells a wide array of specialty construction, cleaning, and safety products. Though based in NJ, RCS Northvale operates call centers that can supply businesses across the United States with premium industrial-grade products, such as the Optrel Satellite welding helmet.

Designed and manufactured by Wattwil, Switzerland-based Optrel AG, the Satellite is equipped with one of the company’s advanced auto-darkening filters (ADF). To detect the brightness of a welding arc, light sensors are positioned around the helmet’s ultraviolet and infrared safety-coated liquid crystal display (LCD) viewing lens, and the ADF automatically adjusts to an appropriate tint.

When a welder is not using his torch, the ADF adjusts the shade-level to #3 or #4, which is relatively easy to see through under normal lighting conditions. Nearly instantaneous with the initiating of a welding arc, the lens will darken to a tint from #9 to #13, depending on the brightness of the torch. Unlike standard lens helmets, which have a static #9 or #10 shade, the Optrel Satellite allows the wearer to pause in the middle of a weld and position the torch accurately to the welding joint, without having to raise the helmet. This is advantageous because it allows the welder to keep the helmet down throughout a job, ensuring safety while increasing efficiency and precision.

The Optrel Satellite also allows users to deactivate the ADF cartridge and manually adjust the lens shade to a setting suitable for a specific welding procedure. By pushing a button on the outside of the helmet, a welder can override the ADF and enable shade 4 grinding mode. In this mode, the user selects one of two shade ranges, #5-#9 or #9-#13, then dials in the preferred tint number using a knob on the helmet shell.

Compliant with ANSI Z87.1-2003, the Optrel Satellite also meets OSHA shade-level standards approved for use with all electrode sizes and arc currents employed in metal arc welding. It is not intended for use in laser or plasma welding.

Cleaning a Keyboard with a Pressure Cleaner

RCS Northvale, an industrial cleaning and safety materials supply company located in NJ, strives to meet its customers’ varied needs. Under the leadership of President Jason Rubach, RCS Northvale offers an extensive line of cleaning products, including pressure cleaners for computer keyboards.

With regular use, computer keyboards accumulate dirt and grime. This accumulation can lead to performance issues with the keyboard, such as stuck keys, difficulty typing, or repeated characters while typing. Therefore, cleaning the keyboard with compressed air is often recommended to keep it in top working order.

To do so, first disconnect the keyboard from the computer. Then, hold the keyboard upside down and employ the compressed air cleaner. The air will dislodge and blow out any dirt and debris that has worked its way into the keyboard between the keys. Tapping on the keyboard can further encourage the foreign matter to fall out. Try holding the keyboard at several different angles to make sure that all the debris falls out. Because this can make a small mess, perform this process over a surface that can be easily cleaned.